An Airplane on Gardner Island?

March 26, 2014 Articles Comments (0) 441

airplaineIt seems that Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for TIGHAR is to put out a press release touting their new find first, and then start an investigation. Not surprisingly many of their press releases have been proven wrong; many of their assumptions have turned out to be wishful thinking. But Ric Gillespie continues to crank out publicity that endeavors to make the general public believe that anything found on Gardner/Nikumaroro Island that isn’t a coconut, a crab or a bird, came from Amelia Earhart’s Electra.

Thanks to Tom Pochick from West Virginia it looks like another bit of TIGHAR’s “research” is about to be turned against them. TIGHAR claims that there was aircraft wreckage on the reef near the SS Norwich City when the first settlers arrived on December 13, 1938. The native population talked about this aircraft in interviews, all of which are available on TIGHAR’s website. TIGHAR, of course, takes these remembrances as “evidence” that there was aircraft wreckage on the reef, and of course any aircraft on Gardner before the US Loran Station was built had to be the Electra. Naturally the eyewitness testimony advances their hypothesis that Earhart landed on Gardner. (We wonder why the eye witness testimony of the Gardner Islanders is believed while the accounts given by witnesses on Mili Atoll and Saipan are termed unsupported, most likely mistaken.)

On March 21, 2012 Tom Pochick sent Ric Gillespie the pictures shown here. Tom had indicated that the photos reveal a plane sitting in the surf off Gardner Island.  Gillespie emailed a response: “I guarantee you, that is not her plane”. We are glad that Gillespie is so sure this isn’t her aircraft. We agree with Tom. We also understand why another aircraft on Gardner Island isn’t what Gillespie and his minions want to hear anything about.

A BIT OF LOGIC

We can assume that there was no aircraft wreckage on Gardner Island when the three aircraft from the USS Colorado performed their aerial search on July 9, 1937. If, as the islanders testify, the aircraft was easily visible at low tide and the water only rises 5 feet at high tide, that means that a fuselage about four feet in diameter would be, at most, a foot underwater.  Isn’t it ludicrous to think that in water as clear as it was then, an aircraft one foot below the surface would be missed by the six men in the search planes, specifically looking for an aircraft?

The Maude-Bevington Expedition of the 13th-15th in October 1937 searched and carefully documented their entire visit to the island. They took a photo of the ship, SS Norwich City, shipwrecked on Gardner since 1929. (The photo contained an object which has been identified by Photek as possibly one of the Electra’s landing gear.) Eric Bevington documented everything he saw, including the fish and octopi in the hold of the derelict ship. We find it unbelievable that Bevington would have failed to mention the landing gear of an airplane sticking up on the dry reef flat.

Later, the New Zealand Expedition took place on November 30, 1938 and failed to find airplane wreckage (or failed to mention it). But, on December 15, 1938 settlers were brought to the island; they lived there until 1964. During that time no aircraft was reported to have crashed on or near the island. The islanders reported there was an aircraft on the reef near the ship. From the looks of the “artifacts” recovered by TIGHAR they salvaged what they could use from the wreckage.map

In conclusion, we can assume there was no aircraft wreckage present before October 15, 1937 and there was aircraft wreckage there on December 15, 1938. Logically it would lead one to the conclusion that the aircraft that the villages saw and salvaged arrived between those dates. If an aircraft crashed or landed on Gardner Island between those dates who did it belong to?

 

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

 

All photos courtesy of Tom Pochick

Are the two white dots located in the square engine nacelles?

Are the two white dots located in the square engine nacelles?

Tom did some contrast work on this image. If it’s not an aircraft, what is it?

Tom did some contrast work on this image. If it’s not an aircraft, what is it?

 

This image shows that the wreck is 347 feet from the tide line. What kind of investigator wouldn’t want to take a look at this up close and personal?

This image shows that the wreck is 347 feet from the tide line. What kind of investigator wouldn’t want to take a look at this up close and personal?

 

This is the same area on Virtual Earth.

This is the same area on Virtual Earth.

These images are 4 degrees 41 minutes 31.49 seconds south and 174 degrees 30 minutes 16.78 seconds west. They are 347 feet from the shore. It appears that the engines are still attached to the wing. If this is the aircraft that the villagers salvaged, it is conceivable that in the 70 odd years it has been there that it has migrated to the present location. According to experts, coral has a very difficult time growing on an aluminum aircraft that is subject to wave action. The aluminum is too flexible and won’t allow the tiny animals to hold on. Steel and iron, because of its rigidity, is perfect for the formation of coral. So an aircraft near the surface would not become encrusted in coral and therefore would look much like it did the day it sank.

It would seem that Gillespie isn’t interested in investigating the presence of an aircraft on Nikumaroro. His interests seem to lie in keeping the mystery of Amelia Earhart alive and producing income. Time after time, when it seemed he had failed in his mission to find AE’s Electra “something” is found to revive the public’s interest.

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